MY BOOKS

Caboodle & The Whole Kit

Relaxing episodes of life, family, love & romance, faith, and even the odd, inadvertent run-ins with some quite unsavoury fictional characters. This anthology of short stories, poetry, and songs also includes the latest edition of KC’s popular short story: The Devil’s Apology.

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Amazon Review: Kevin Cooper’s Caboodle and the Whole Kit (2016) is part fan fiction for lovers of JR Tolkien, Star Wars, Wuthering Heights and other favorite literary characters and the rest a ‘caboodle of the whole kit’. Cooper cleverly puts the reader in favorite literary scenes through the eyes of today’s reader by posing a conversation between favorite characters and Kev. When he’s not chatting with and interviewing the greats in literature, he is sharing folk songs, poetry, and even short stories–all with an eye on fun and entertainment. For example:

Interview with Heathcliff
Place: Wuthering Heights: Near a cliff over by the heath on the North Yorkshire Moors, England. Wanting to escape the heavy downpour and ferocious winds, Kev hammers on the door of a remote farmhouse.
Kev: Tell me a little about yourself, Heathcliff. You are no doubt a gentleman yet live in this squalor of a farmhouse?
This is not the typical read. Enjoy it. Be mesmerized by the creativity. Start and stop as time permits, fitting the entries around and between other activities as a way to forget reality for just a little bit.

Highly recommended for those who love a non-traditional approach to many of the classics. Jacqui Murray

Animal Tales

A delightful collection of short stories and poetry, most of which were inspired by real life events and animals.

All profits from Animal Tales are donated to Animal Rescue Centres.

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Amazon Review: “Animals Tales” is a delightful mixture of poems and short stories about pets. One poem brought a smile to my face. A Source of Joy: “Paws at the ready—Anticipating—Movement on the screen…”. I could easily relate to a computer screen being under attack! Some of the work focused on the author’s cats. I enjoyed, and connected to that part of the book. I really appreciated reading through the animal’s eyes, in some of the pieces. There was a short story, though, that really moved me. A Life for a Life that was about dog abuse. It was painful to read parts of it, yet, there was a lot of hope in the tale, too. This collection of short stories and poems is for anyone who is a pet owner or just loves animals. D.L. Finn

The Wizard, The Girl and The Unicorn’s Horn

A children’s fantasy that takes you to the magical land of Geo where people, goblins and even trolls live in relative harmony but things change drastically when the evil shadow comes with his demon hordes. The fate of the people along with all of Geo now rests in the hands of the old worn out wizard, a ragtag bunch of goblins, and a mysterious little girl.

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Amazon Review: This is a great fantasy tale with superb characters. Kevin introduces goblins, trolls, a wizard, wargs, the girl, and the Pegasus. Oh, and humans too. It’s an adventure story for any age, with some thoughtful messages. There are some tough and harsh moments as every being strives to avoid and fights against evil. Some don’t make it, hence the realism mixed in with the fantasy, yet, we are left with hope for the future. Roughseas

Looking forward to the sequel.

Miedo 2: A Reckoning With Fear

As Miedo comes into young adulthood, he is confronted with new demons while he searches for answers to his past through Spiritualism. But, rather than finding answers, he is left with more questions as a plethora of paranormal experiences occur in his life yet again. His spiritual journey leads him towards the path of Christianity, but where will his physical journey take him?

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Amazon Review: I enjoyed Cooper’s first memoir, Miedo: Living Beyond Childhood Fear, and when I finally picked up this sequel, I liked it even more than the first. It continues the story of Cooper’s early life through his teens, including his struggle to find his place in the world, understand the role of faith in his life, and control the demons that continue to plague him.

Told in the 3rd person, the memoir reads like a story, and Miedo is a highly sympathetic character. I related to his feelings of displacement, and the rambling style of Cooper’s narration perfectly reflects that time of life when young adults are stumbling about and trying to define who they are. In some ways, the narrative reminds me of Frank McCourt (Angela’s Ashes) as it picks up on the day to day seemingly insignificant events that make up a life. People and jobs, plans and friends come and go like water through Miedo’s fingers. His sense of belonging never seems to have a strong anchor though there are some relationships that he relies on.

Cooper does an excellent job of telling his story in Miedo’s authentic “voice,” reflecting his age and education at the time events unfold. The narrative also happens in the moment. In other words, this is not a memoir that the authors relates with the benefit of hindsight, but one that unfolds for the reader as it happens.

Miedo 2: A Reckoning with Fear isn’t a long read. Cooper’s style is unique and his story is addicting. I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys memoirs and stories about the struggle to overcome difficult childhoods. I’m looking forward to the next book in the series. D.W. Peach

Miedo: Living Beyond Childhood Fear

A memoir written as a British Drama set in the historical city of hull during the mid-1960s-1980s. This is the true story of a boy who after losing his mother at a very young age, begins to experience a plethora of paranormal incidents brought about through the circumstances of living within a dysfunctional family, resulting in a childhood filled with fear.

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Amazon Review: It’s been quite a number of years since reading a book seized my day completely – from dawn to dusk, and this time it was “Miedo: Living Beyond Childhood Fear” by Kevin Cooper.

Experiencing, as a reader, the grip of the adult world of tragic and disquieting events, and emotions they bring, through a child’s then a teenager’s eyes comes only via a literary recipe for human endurance that takes true mastery to complete. Kevin Cooper, most skillfully, brings us the story of a boy who at very early age loses his mother in circumstances he did not understand or know and, although experiencing fears and nightmares render him a ‘bed-wetter’, his grandparents shape his childhood into a rich plethora of joy and fun undertakings until his father remarries and he is taken away from his grandparents’ home to live with his father, step-mother and two older sisters.

Miedo takes us on a journey both sharply and smoothly jagged with childhood fears, nightmares, insecurities, domestic aggression, abuse, kind love, delightful but cheeky childhood adventures, true friendships that last and those one loses through cruel fate. The reader is transported to and mesmerised by a child’s journey and navigation through a life in which that child often appears as an unnoticed passenger waiting or needing to get off at “the next stop” and yet finds himself stuck in that life where he must find his permanent place, forge his own survival tricks or strategies to emerge as a rather well-balanced teenager en route to independence and adulthood.

The switching between first and third person narration of a child then teenager is quite captivating in this book as the third party narration comes through at times like salvation from utter terror, or defence mechanism from terror or fear. The switches between first and third person narration are executed brilliantly as are the frequent and sharp transitions from scene to scene, life event to life event. Kevin Cooper has mastered in this book the language of “shooting straight and clear” when it comes to the child’s life events, experiences, emotions and adventures and his skillful descriptions of scenes and relationships contain no surplus words – very to the point and unwavering clarity.

Miedo is a gripping account of a child’s survival through many life’s cruel servings and I simply loved reading it. The last time I enjoyed reading a book with similar style so very much – i.e. narration through a child’s/teenagers experiences was some ten years ago when I read the 2003 Booker Prize Winner “Vernon God Little” by DBC Pierre. However, Miedo to me represents a much better read than this; although Miedo has a lot to be bitter about in life he evades and circumvents bitterness and replaces it with hovering tolerance and constructive albeit at times troublesome childhood endeavours. The remarkable tenacity for survival that can be found in a child is well represented in this book; it is a striking thread the reader can detect as weaved subliminally throughout the book.

I thoroughly recommend “Miedo: Living Beyond Childhood Fear” by Kevin Cooper. Ina Vukic, Prof; B.A., M.A. Ps.

The Devil’s Apology

In this short epic fantasy/satire, the devil gives his account of what went on when he fell from grace. He speaks of how it all began and depicts God as the culprit. Witness the powers of the heavens in majestic battles between angels and demons as he retells the story.

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Amazon Review: Captured in conversational first person, the Devil in this Apology isn’t the least bit contrite—nor hellbent on converting you to his way of thinking. Recounted as memoir, and reinforced by biblical concept, The Devil’s Apology doesn’t just embrace spiritual skepticism, it lauds it. Author Kevin Cooper is on figurative fire, naming key players in a narrative that echoes the older-than-ages battle between God and the Devil, and updates it simultaneously, tying in probing, theological questions to rudimentary string theory. A blue-print for any devil’s advocate, The Devil’s Apology is a page-turner, with apocalyptic undertone that paves a provocative alternative alongside the standard, spiritual path. Karen Robiscoe

Reflections: The Illustrative Version

A collection of poetry and songs about love, life, relationships, and musings about things we can’t truly explain like dreams or Déjà vu, Each poem has an illustration that perfectly complements it. Reflections will open you up to feelings of awe and wonder.

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Amazon Review: This is the first poetry book that I have read that included illustrations. Each illustration compliments and reflects the poem simply and beautifully. The illustrations remind me of a painting in an art gallery. There are a few poems that I could relate to on a personal level. They carry words of life and beauty. Words of finding love in a musical way. One poem actually seemed as if it was a song. I am not one for spoilers so pick up your copy and find your inspiration. Jazzy Jenness