While The Bombs Fell

What was it like for children growing up in rural Suffolk during World War 2?
Elsie and her family live in a small double-storey cottage in Bungay, Suffolk. Every night she lies awake listening anxiously for the sound of the German bomber planes. Often they come and the air raid siren sounds signalling that the family must leave their beds and venture out to the air raid shelter in the garden.
Despite the war raging across the English channel, daily life continues with its highlights, such as Christmas and the traditional Boxing Day fox hunt, and its wary moments when Elsie learns the stories of Jack Frost and the ghostly and terrifying Black Shuck that haunts the coastline and countryside of East Anglia.
Includes some authentic World War 2 recipes

As I read, While the Bombs Fell, I had a deep sense of nostalgia despite growing up in a different era… One of peace time. I think it’s probably to do with some of things I could relate to such as the use of a mangle, a galvanised tub to bathe in, and having only an outside toilet in the backyard.

It is an enjoyable read that serves to remind us how fortunate we are to have the the things we have today and to be living in peacetime Britain.

Amazon Link

42 thoughts on “While The Bombs Fell

  1. Thanks Kevin for sharing your review. It is very empathetic to see how the older lived through the horrors of war. I just look forward to a time where those who are suffering the brunts of war in different corners of the world can have peace.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. I will check it out next time I get around to your blog… I try to get around to everyone at least once a month and there are a lot of folks to get through, but I enjoy connecting with all I can. So bare with me. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

  3. It seems that we both like and write music, as I have listened to some of your songs. There are plenty of my musical compositions and arrangements for you to relish in my said post, should you be curious or inclined to connect with SoundEagle in the sonic domain through the universal language of music.

    May you find this autumn very much to your liking and highly conducive to your writing, thinking and blogging!

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Hi Kevin,

    Please be informed that my said post will take a while to load completely, and will benefit from being viewed on a large screen of a desktop and laptop computer, since the lengthy multimedia post and my blog could be too powerful and feature-rich for iPad, iPhone, tablet or other portable devices to handle properly or adequately.

    Ahhh, I see that you have found the said post, and I shall await your leaving me a feedback at the comment section there.

    Also, I just realize that in my haste, I have replied to the wrong commenter: instead of replying to Teagan R. Geneviene whom I mentioned in my earlier comment, I have replied to Mae Clair by mistake. Hence, as a result of Murphy’s law, I am going to reply to the right person now by repeating the following:

    I also concur with Teagan R. Geneviene. Thank you for reminding us how lucky we are in peacetime.

    During the World War 2, Vera Lynn was singing “Nightingale Sang on Berkeley Square” in 1942. Madam Lynn must be over 100 years old by now, if I am not mistaken.

    When the haunting Warsaw Concerto was being broadcast as the theme song from the movie “Dangerous Moonlight”, my old friend Fred Atkin had the following story to tell at 08:19 PM on 19/04/2005:

    Can you imagine the impact this made when first released? It was, of course, before the days when one could sit for long periods in front of a square box where entertainment was brought to you in your own home. When going to the pictures was the obvious way of a good evening out and a means of entertaining your girl friend with a bit of romance.

    But more than that. I forget the exact year but for a long time we had all been enduring the privations of black-outs, food rationing, shortages of all kinds and had lived with barrage balloons, searchlights, the drone of aircraft overhead, hour after hour in the air raid shelter – to say nothing of bombs coming down and AA fire going up. Also a time when everyone was in uniform of one kind or another – or getting ready to get into uniform for the youngsters – and in one way or another “doing their bit”. Films, then, were doubly important and the subject matter of “Dangerous Moonlight” was one we could all fully appreciate, the devastation following the German occupation of Poland. So, even today, when the older generation hear the music, they associate it with those times.

    In addition, my late mother was twice nearly sent to an internment camp as an enemy alien during the Japanese occupation, as detailed in my latest post published at https://soundeagle.wordpress.com/2019/08/31/khai-khim-for-always-and-beyond-goodbye/

    Liked by 2 people

  5. I had that same sense of gratitude when reading this book, Kevin. Robbie did a wonderful job of placing the reader into the lives of the children, enabling us to view the war through their eyes.
    Great review!

    Liked by 5 people

  6. Hi Kevin Cooper,

    I also concur with Teagan R. Geneviene. Thank you for reminding us how lucky we are in peacetime.

    During the World War 2, Vera Lynn was singing “Nightingale Sang on Berkeley Square” in 1942. Madam Lynn must be over 100 years old by now, if I am not mistaken.

    When the haunting Warsaw Concerto was being broadcast as the theme song from the movie “Dangerous Moonlight”, my old friend Fred Atkin had the following story to tell at 08:19 PM on 19/04/2005:

    Can you imagine the impact this made when first released? It was, of course, before the days when one could sit for long periods in front of a square box where entertainment was brought to you in your own home. When going to the pictures was the obvious way of a good evening out and a means of entertaining your girl friend with a bit of romance.

    But more than that. I forget the exact year but for a long time we had all been enduring the privations of black-outs, food rationing, shortages of all kinds and had lived with barrage balloons, searchlights, the drone of aircraft overhead, hour after hour in the air raid shelter – to say nothing of bombs coming down and AA fire going up. Also a time when everyone was in uniform of one kind or another – or getting ready to get into uniform for the youngsters – and in one way or another “doing their bit”. Films, then, were doubly important and the subject matter of “Dangerous Moonlight” was one we could all fully appreciate, the devastation following the German occupation of Poland. So, even today, when the older generation hear the music, they associate it with those times.

    In addition, my late mother was twice nearly sent to an internment camp as an enemy alien during the Japanese occupation, as detailed in my latest post published at https://soundeagle.wordpress.com/2019/08/31/khai-khim-for-always-and-beyond-goodbye/

    Liked by 3 people

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